Brain balance and Flexibility

Frequently Asked Questions

  • 1What is the difference between Brain balance and Flexibility?
  • 2What is Brain Balance?
  • 3What is Brain Flexibility?
  • 4What is SNS Flexibility?
  • 5What is PNS Flexibility?
  • 6What is SNS/PNS Balance?
  • 7What is Brainwave Ratio?
  • 8What is Brainwave Stability?
  • 9What is Domiant Frequency?
  • 10What is Phase?
  • 11What is Coherence?

There are two main principles that underlie our approach; brain balance and brain flexibility.

  • oBalance - equality of distribution or equilibrium between oppositional forces.
  • oFlexibility - the ability to move fluidly and effortlessly.
  • The brain mediates your perception, thoughts and actions.
  • If one part of the system is out of balance, the effects can ripple out into many other areas.
  • If you are experiencing emotional or functional difficulties, we will see over or under-activity in the corresponding areas of the brain.
  • These areas will be working harder than the others, and putting the brain out of balance.
  • When our brain activity is out of balance, there will be corresponding problems in our emotional or physical health. 
  • What you use grows stronger.
  • This is as true for the brain as for physical muscles, and is called neuroplasticity.
  • With repeated use, a thought, mood, or emotional state becomes a ‘habit’.
  • The habit grows into a trait; a trait becomes a constant state.
  • If the brain is out of balance and loses its flexibility, you may get stuck thinking when trying to sleep, dreaming when trying to concentrate, or be saddled with uncomfortable emotions.
  • The brain has been pushed out of balance, and has lost the flexibility needed to shift out of it.
  • The Sympathetic Nervous System (SNS) is your internal accelerator – it governs your alert state, your adrenal function, and arousal level.
  • If this critical system is locked into an ‘on’ position, you can be plagued with sleeplessness, anxiety, and racing thoughts – perhaps a low-level panic as you drive.
  • You can think of it of having your foot firmly planted on the accelerator pedal at all times, which makes it difficult to slow down.
  • Stress and anxiety
  • The Parasympathetic Nervous System (PNS) can be thought of as your internal brake pedal. The opposite action of the SNS, it governs your ‘rest and digest’ function.
  • If the PNS is permanently engaged, it can result in digestive trouble, lack of ‘pep’, enthusiasm and vitality.
  • You may feel generally disconnected from your vehicle, or not quite at home inside.
  • Social skills and intimacy
  • Sleep and fatigue
  • When our SNS accelerator and PNS brakes are both fully engaged, try as we might we will have difficulty getting anywhere at all with any comfort.
  • You may even end up swinging from high energy to extreme lows.
  • It is, of course, an exceptionally poor use of mental energy.
  • Trauma and PTSD
  • Emotional Balance
  • Is your attention going to where you put it, and can you hold your attention there as long as you need it to?
  • Or are you fiddling with the radio, checking messages, or staring off into the countryside rather than being able to stay on task?
  • Does your mind drift somewhere completely different than where you intended it to?
  • Attention training
  • If your brain is unstable, it is akin to having poor wheel alignment.
  • Whenever you try to get somewhere, your emotions or actions may shake, wobble and buffet around.
  • Migraines, epilepsy, tics, and a number of other symptoms may result from poor stability.
  • Emotional Balance
  • How much brain power is available?
  • Is power running short in a certain area, or all the energy is being used somewhere other than where it’s needed?
  • Without enough energy to get through the day, your mind will fade and falter.
  • Sleep and Fatigue 
  • Many of the brain’s functions are timed events.
  • Timing can be crucial – signals from one part of the brain should arrive at another area at just the right moment to perform a specific task efficiently.
  • When the delay is excessive the signals arrive too early; deficient, and it’s too late.
  • In either case, it can make it difficult to get from point A to point B if the controls aren’t doing what you want them to, when you want them to do it.
  • Autism, Dyslexia or Developmental
  • In order to properly make sense of the world around us and accomplish complex tasks, the different parts of the brain must share information.
  • If different areas are not connecting to each other, getting anywhere can be tough.
  • Learning Disabilities may show either (or both) excessive or deficient coherence characteristics; serious traumatic brain injury classically results in excessive coherence.
  • Autism, Dyslexia or Developmental

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